Tuesday, February 27, 2007

The Episcopal Bishop of South Dakota speaks

This somewhat for internal consumption by Episcopalians but others may be interested too. Our Bishop is not an activist and like most of us wants to keep the dialogue open with all that care about where we are going.

Here's his main point, I think:
As a Bishop of this Church, I cannot turn my back on full inclusion for all persons, which has been at the heart of ministry in this Diocese since Bishop Hare came to Dakota Territory to minister to the Native People of this land, and continues to this day as we open our doors to all who would like to worship in this Church in South Dakota.


Read on:

+Creighton of South Dakota
2/27/07

Comments:
Dear Friends in Christ:

Many in this Diocese, and beyond, have been awaiting a communication from the Primates meeting in Tanzania which took place on February 15-19, which concerned their response to The Episcopal Church's action in 2003 concerning the Consecration of Bishop V. Gene Robinson in New Hampshire. Collateral issues concerned TEC's developing rites for the Blessing of same-gender marriages and unions; and, the issue of foreign Bishops making visitations to some congregations in Dioceses of TEC, without prior request of the Bishop exercising jurisdiction over a particular area. The full text of the Primates' Communique can be found on the website of the Episcopal News Service.

Personally, I am offended by some of the recommendations of the Primates of the Anglican Communication, some of which would require TEC to turn it's back on decades of work to provide for the Episcopal Church, full inclusion of persons.

This concept of full inclusion has been affirmed at our Diocesan Convention in 2006, when Fr. Tim Fountain presented a resolution to provide a "safe place" for all persons and congregations in this Diocese, in order that we may become an inclusive Diocese and a place for all people to worship our Lord.

As a Bishop of this Church, I cannot turn my back on full inclusion for all persons, which has been at the heart of ministry in this Diocese since Bishop Hare came to Dakota Territory to minister to the Native People of this land, and continues to this day as we open our doors to all who would like to worship in this Church in South Dakota. We simply cannot now turn our collective backs on those who wish to worship with us and I call on all congregations to continue to be a "safe place" for all to gather in our Lord's name. This is an issue of justice and morality which will engage the wider church in the days and months ahead

As we move forward in proclaiming the Gospel in this Diocese, my prayer will be that this Diocese can be a place where divergent views can be expressed; where all can be welcomed to worship our Lord; and that we might be a prophetic voice and an advocate for full inclusion for all people from all walks of life, as our Baptismal Covenant requires us to do.

Faithfully,

+Creighton L. Robertson
IX Bishop of South Dakota

1 comment:

  1. Anonymous22:12

    What wonderful words coming from someone who has no problem closing down Native churches. The bishop talks about Native American people as if he loves them and yet his legacy will be that he spit on his own people. He should come clean and admit that Native churches are a financial burden to him. P.S. Where's the money Robertson?

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